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About These Blogs: The JPL Science & Technology Blogs are a way for our researchers and technical staff to give first-hand accounts of the activities that are going on at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A cross-section of our staff contribute posts about the tasks they are currently involved in for NASA and JPL. These blog posts are meant to discuss technical topics. Selected comments that are on-topic are published and are moderated.

Latest Entries
09.03.2010 10:23 AM

By Bjorn Lambrigtsen

Yesterday the NASA Global Hawk flew over Hurricane Earl for about 8 hours. It took off from NASA's Dryden facility at Edwards AFB near Mojave, CA at 9 pm the previous evening. After climbing above 50,000 feet to get out of airline traffic lanes, it flew across the southern US to the Gulf and across Florida, and acquired the storm 8 hours later. At that time it had climbed to 60,000 feet. Although the Global Hawk flies itself ...Read More on ''

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11.16.2009 8:39 AM
Ruwan Somawardhana

By Ruwan Somawardhana
Spacecraft Thermal Engineering

During the Juno Critical Design Review (CDR), a question was raised whether the power cycling of the TWTA (electronics box) on the Telecom Panel could adversely thermal cycle the other electronics boxes mounted around the TWTA. This action item was assigned to me to evaluate the expected thermal cycling affects could be expected during typical operations.

Using the Thermal Math Model (TMM) developed earlier, I set the model up for a transient case that would simulate a science pass expected ...Read More on 'Spacecraft Thermal Engineering'

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11.10.2009 4:50 PM

By Hui Su

Today, it was JPL’s R&TD, DRDF and SURP Poster Conference. This is an annual event organized by the Office of the Chief Scientist and Chief Technologist (OCSCT). It presents the latest advances in science and technology funded by JPL’s discretionary funds, the Research and Technology Development (R&TD), Director's Research and Development Fund (DRDF), and Strategic University Research Partnership (SURP) programs. I was one of the presenters because I received the Lew Allen Award for Excellence last ...Read More on ''

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11.02.2009 10:36 AM

By Thierry Leblanc

This MOHAVE 2009 Campaign was a great opportunity to meet young, and less young, scientists of various horizons. Among the youngest were two wonderful graduate students, Monique Calhoun from Howard University, Maryland, and Corinne Straub from University of Bern, Switzerland. Monique started her first graduate year just two weeks before the beginning of the campaign, while Corinne had already completed one year. This blog is posted on their behalf. Two interesting contributions, the MOHAVE 2009 ...Read More on ''

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10.20.2009 3:53 PM

By Hui Su

Last Thursday, October 15, was an exciting day for bloggers. It was the Blog Action Day, an annual event that bloggers around the world post about the same issue on the same day on their own blogs, with the aim of sparking discussion around an issue of global importance. This year, the topic was climate change. I represented JPL to write a blog about the roles of clouds play in climate change and how NASA JPL contributes to the studies of clouds and climate change (see http://blogs.jpl.nasa.gov). ...Read More on ''

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10.19.2009 11:12 AM

By Thierry Leblanc

MOHAVE 2009, or “How Dry is the Atmosphere in Wrightwood?”
Well, just check this picture and you will have an idea right away…

SheepFire
Ironically, the “Sheep Fire” which started Saturday October 3rd, 2009 in Lytle Creek Canyon, propagated up the mountain 10 miles farther within 12 hours in an average ambient relative humidity of 45% and near-freezing temperatures! The top of Lone Pine Canyon, where the San Bernardino County Fire fighters successfully stopped ...Read More on ''

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10.06.2009 5:26 PM

By Hui Su

I work closely with my colleague, Dr. Jonathan Jiang, to study interactions among aerosols, clouds, water vapor and precipitation. Besides analyzing satellite data, we plan to expand our work to use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model. Combining multi-satellite observations, we can obtain correlations between various measurements; however, the causal relationships can not be easily determined. Thus, we are going to use a dynamic model with interactive aerosol-cloud module to study the ...Read More on ''

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09.30.2009 6:26 PM
Parker Fagrelius

By Parker Fagrelius
Astronomy and Physics Missions Concepts

Recently, I have been given the opportunity to represent the lab in a variety of situations: in Europe as a representative for a US/JPL contribution to an ESA-led mission, as an early career hire (ECH) in a briefing to Lori Garver (NASA deputy director) during her visit of JPL, and this coming November as a woman at a conference entitled “Women in Astronomy and Space Science 2009.” These opportunities have been a great honor and I am humbled by the level of confidence the lab has had in me, having ...Read More on 'Astronomy and Physics Missions Concepts'

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09.24.2009 9:41 AM
Ruwan Somawardhana

By Ruwan Somawardhana
Spacecraft Thermal Engineering

As a follow-up to my previous entry regarding the bonding issues of the thermal spreader, I was able to complete a Thermal Math Model (TMM) to verify my hand calculations. The TMM results confirmed that even with a “dry” mount, meaning there was no bond material and only conductance due to the mechanical fasteners were used, there was sufficient thermal margin that the electronics boxes would not violate their AFT requirements. However, by having a good “wet” interface, meaning a uniformly filled ...Read More on 'Spacecraft Thermal Engineering'

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09.22.2009 4:36 PM

By Hui Su

I have not blogged in the last two weeks as I was occupied by two week-long meetings in a row. The first one was the Cloud-Climate Feedback workshop hosted by the Keck Institute for Space Studies in Caltech, organized by Prof. Yuk Yung and Dr. Joao Teixeira. It was a very enlightening workshop. Students and postdocs got together with a number of world-renowned experts on clouds studies and had in-depth discussions about front-edge science regarding cloud climate feedbacks. Scientists shared their ...Read More on ''

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Next 10
Author Bios

Erik Bailey
Guidance and Control Systems Engineering
Julie Castillo
Planetary Ices
Parker Fagrelius
Astronomy and Physics Missions Concepts
Chuck Manning
Microdevices Laboratory
Jeff Norris
Supervisor, Planning Software Systems Group
Tom Roberts
Optical Communications
Ruwan Somawardhana
Spacecraft Thermal Engineering

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